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bpod-mrc:

22 April 2014
Nobel Nerves
Italian neurologist Rita Levi-Montalcini – born on this day in 1909 – received the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine, along with Stanley Cohen, for their discovery that a protein called nerve growth factor plays a key role in the development of the nervous system. But particularly remarkable is how Levi-Montalcini managed to conduct her research at a time when Mussolini prevented non-Aryan Italian citizens from having academic careers. This impelled Levi-Montalcini to set up a laboratory in her bedroom at her family home in Turin. Following heavy bombing by English and American forces, she left Turin to rebuild her mini-laboratory in a cottage in the country. When the German army invaded Italy, she fled to Florence to work as a doctor for war refugees. After the war, she went to Washington University, St. Louis, USA, and remained there for thirty years. She died in December 2012 aged 103.
Written by Nick Kennedy
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Image courtesy of audrey_sel on Flickr Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence
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You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

She was fired from her university for being Jewish, and many of the laws introduced by the fascist dictatorship in Italy were aimed at barring Jewish people from professional work. 

aibnbf:

bpod-mrc:

22 April 2014

Nobel Nerves

Italian neurologist Rita Levi-Montalcini – born on this day in 1909 – received the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine, along with Stanley Cohen, for their discovery that a protein called nerve growth factor plays a key role in the development of the nervous system. But particularly remarkable is how Levi-Montalcini managed to conduct her research at a time when Mussolini prevented non-Aryan Italian citizens from having academic careers. This impelled Levi-Montalcini to set up a laboratory in her bedroom at her family home in Turin. Following heavy bombing by English and American forces, she left Turin to rebuild her mini-laboratory in a cottage in the country. When the German army invaded Italy, she fled to Florence to work as a doctor for war refugees. After the war, she went to Washington University, St. Louis, USA, and remained there for thirty years. She died in December 2012 aged 103.

Written by Nick Kennedy

Image courtesy of audrey_sel on Flickr
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

She was fired from her university for being Jewish, and many of the laws introduced by the fascist dictatorship in Italy were aimed at barring Jewish people from professional work. 

(via fuckyeajews)

Posted 1 day ago
Anonymous: I live close to Dearborn, MI which has the largest Muslim population outside of the middle east and while I'm there all the time and know a lot of people there I've never been treated poorly for being Jewish by anyone Muslim. I think it's because they know what it's like being ridiculed and judged. However my white Christian and Atheist peers and even "friends" have made holocaust jokes, ridiculed me, pretty much made me uncomfortable countless times in unimaginable ways.

Thanks for sharing your experiences.

Posted 5 days ago
Anonymous: Do you think the Jewish registration that's happening in the Ukraine right now is actually government mandated? Either way it's gross 20th century anti-semitism. I'm worried for our people :/

I have been super busy this past week so I haven’t had the opportunity or energy to read very much about what’s going on, but what I have read has me extremely worried.

Followers, any additional thoughts/insights?

Posted 5 days ago
Anonymous: Jewish problems: to have an Italian boyfriend, whose mother is worse than yours (you know what I mean)

…I don’t know what you mean, actually.

Seriously, let’s not make fun of other cultures by stereotyping them.

Posted 5 days ago
Anonymous: What are your views on conversion? A friend of mine says it's impossible and that those that convert aren't real Jews. I feel more like, idk, if a religion calls to you why shouldn't you practice it?

Full disclosure, my mother converted to Judaism so I may have a more personal perspective on this than other Jewish people.  I wish people were kinder to those who converted and there wasn’t so much stigma surrounding it.  Jews who converted are “real Jews” in every way and sometimes have a deeper understanding and appreciation of Judaism than those who were born into it.  To say only people who are born ethnically Jewish are true Jews reeks of ethnic elitism and does not sit right by me at all.  Obviously someone who is ethnically Jewish is going to have a much different experience and history than someone who converted to Judaism but all of this is part of the overall Jewish experience and none of it should be ignored or discounted.

Posted 5 days ago
Anonymous: Why is goy considered offensive?

It can sometimes be used pejoratively towards non-Jewish people, specifically and especially Christians.  I personally don’t consider it to be all that offensive seeing as all it means is you’re not Jewish, but I do not speak for all Jews everywhere.

Posted 5 days ago
Anonymous: Wait... wtf I just saw that question about the friend with a star of david and "never again" that is so unbelievable. I kind of want to hear more about that because it can't be right...I mean he has to be Jewish or have a Jewish family. It must be a misunderstanding.

Maybe the person who originally submitted the message will elaborate?

Posted 5 days ago
Anonymous: The anon who keeps referring to "Moslems" sounds like they're making shit up.

Oh, absolutely.

Posted 5 days ago

I keep getting anti-Muslim/Islamophobic questions and comments in my ask box.

Let me be very clear that I do not support this bullshit one bit and everyone who sends me anything about how “OMG Muslims hate Jews!!!1!” will be blocked immediately.

Posted 5 days ago
Anonymous: my friend has a tattoo of the star of david with "never again" underneath it, and he's not Jewish. Is that cultural appropriation?

Yes.

Posted 5 days ago
fancyjew: As you are also a Jew I need to ask. Do you enjoy watching the food network and television during passover? I love watching all the food and testing my own limits, but I wanted to know if other people do it as well or avoid such torture.

Hahahaha, I very rarely watch the Food Network at all, but I totally know where you’re coming from.

Posted 6 days ago
Anonymous: Would you say that someone who wishes to convert to Judaism is committing cultural appropriation?

No, not at all, as long as they want to convert for sincere reasons, I don’t view it as appropriation at all.  My mother converted and I’ve watched her have to sort of hide that from a lot of people due to negative stereotypes about converts.

An example of cultural appropriation would be not being Jewish and getting a Hebrew tattoo because “it’s so beautiful and exotic” and “Christianity comes from Judaism so it’s okay!!!”

Posted 6 days ago
miquelaxo: In a past post (the one about the Ethiopian Jew not being able to get an apartment in Kiriat Malachi) you mentioned that Jews are 0.2% we are actually 0.02%

Thank you for the correction but I literally have no idea what post you’re referring to.

Posted 6 days ago
Anonymous: It does matter the fact that he's Moslem, why should I act like it's nothing while he was clearly against Jews?? He shouted infront of the whole class that all Jews need to die,and that he will kill me if no one else does!

Everything he said was awful but his religion still isn’t relevant.  So he’s Muslim—so what?  What does that have to do with anything?  All it does is serve to further the false stereotype all Muslims hate Jews.

Posted 6 days ago
saveenteen: Hello! My friends invited me to their Passover dinner. I am so happy and honored they did that:) I've been reading about Passover but is there any thing I need to know about the actual celebration? Like any special traditions or words said at dinner. I don't want to be rude at all. Thank you so much:) I'm sorry if I phrased this oddly. Haha thank you!

No worries, you didn’t phrase it oddly at all!  I think if you talk to your friends about the seder and ask them questions as politely as you did here, you should be fine.  If your friends trust you enough to invite you, they are likely more than prepared and willing to provide some education as well.

Do any followers have any advice here as well?

Posted 6 days ago